A group of Black dancers consisting of adults and children are spread out in a dark stage space. They wear red jumpers, red and blue checked skirts and trousers and red stockings and move tensely.
© Manuel Osterholt
A group of Black dancers consisting of adults and children are spread out in a dark stage space. They wear red jumpers, red and blue checked skirts and trousers and red stockings and move tensely.
© Manuel Osterholt

Constanza Macras / Dorky Park

The Visitors

Tickets:

44/36/24/14 Euro (conc. from 9 Euro, [k]-Karte from 7 Euro)

Info

Recommended from 14 years. Sensory triggers: Mirrors on stage produce flashing light effects in one scene, loud and high-pitched sounds, use of fog. Content details/trigger warnings: Clown/rabbit and other masks, fake blood and plastic knives, depiction of stabbing, strangulation, suffocation. Thematisation of anti-black and anti-Asian racism, use of ableist language.

Past dates

Archive

Wednesday

9/27/23

8:00 PM

k6

90 Min.

Archive

Thursday

9/28/23

8:00 PM

k6

90 Min.

Audience talk with Constanza Macras, moderated by Jessica Nupen.

Archive

Friday

9/29/23

8:00 PM

k6

90 Min.

Archive

Saturday

9/30/23

8:00 PM

k6

90 Min.

With THE VISITORS, Constanza Macras continues the collaboration between DorkyPark and many of the young South African performers from her successful show Hillbrowfication in 2018. The new cast also includes performers from Windybrow Arts Centre.

The new production delves into the strange world of slasher films, a sub-genre of horror cinema with its own narrative codes and aesthetic style. In these films, mainly teenagers are threatened and killed, while parents and other adults are absent or unable to help them in any way. The teenagers always have to fight the monsters alone. The killers may seem like faceless actors in a violence that comes out of nowhere, but they are often the result of the horrors of the past. "The past comes back to haunt you," goes an adagio of the slasher genre.

In THE VISITORS, these themes are further clarified by the South African context: the absence of parents, for example, takes on a very special connotation as a result of the state-orchestrated destruction of family structures during apartheid. Furthermore, the typical slasher "hunt" becomes a trope for local and global issues, such as the capitalist negotiation of bodies and spaces: whose bodies are allowed to occupy which spaces and whose are chased away, expelled or deported. Whose bodies are allowed to move freely and whose bodies are condemned to stay where they are (e.g. through denied visa applications). The "horror" can thus also appear in everyday situations such as dealing with bureaucracy and corruption.

Through non-linear narratives and humorous associations, the young protagonists try to free themselves from the grip of these old monsters. They try to move from the relentless return of the past to a time made up of other pasts, presences and futures, where it is possible to create spaces for thinking and hoping.

A large group of Black people stand in a dark stage space. They are all singing with their mouths wide open. All are wearing red sweaters. Paper is strewn on the floor.
© Manuel Osterholt
In a dark, red-lit room, four women in wedding dresses walk around sublimely. The light makes the dresses look blood-red.
© Manuel Osterholt
Five dancers, two of them children, stand on one leg each in a dark room filled with white mist from behind. They clap their hands.
© Manuel Osterholt
A group of black dancers in elegant ball gowns whirl around in a circle in a stage area. The dresses are made of tulle and satin and are trimmed with glitter and gemstones.
© Manuel Osterholt
Four Black people in red overalls, two of them children, stand next to each other next to a beige-orange grid installation. The smallest child wears a creepy monster mask. All are barefoot.
© Manuel Osterholt
Ten Black adults and children in pompous costumes with tulle skirts, frills and glitter stand with their backs to the camera in a dark stage space. One person in front moves elegantly in a dance pose.
© Manuel Osterholt
A group of Black dancers consisting of adults and children are spread out in a dark stage space. They wear red jumpers, red and blue checked skirts and trousers and red stockings and move tensely.
© Manuel Osterholt
Fourteen black adults and children in pompous costumes with tulle skirts, frills and glitter stand with their backs to the camera in a dark stage space. A child in blue lies backwards on the floor, hands outstretched above her head.
© Manuel Osterholt
A bright red poster design in the style of 80s horror movies. A figure wears a mask with X as eyes and holds up a pipe wrench as a weapon.
© Kruger Van Deventer
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Choreography, direction Constanza Macras Dramaturgy Tamara Saphir Costume Design Roman Handt Music Spoek Mathambo Original Choral Songs Nhlanhla Mahlangu Original songs Mr. Bribes and Goldilocks Brandon Mangengelele und Jackson Mogotlane Stage Noluthando Lobese Costume and Stage assistance Marcus Barros Cardoso Artistic and technical assistance for stage design SimonLesemann Technical management & lighting design Sergio Pessanha Sound design Stephan Wöhrmann Assistant Director Mica Heilmann Tour Management Nompilo Vinolia Hadebe Company & production management Jimena Soria Production Vicky Kouraraki Production assistance Diego Villalobos Production in South Africa Gerard Bester, Zintle Radebe, Linda Michael Mkhwanaz and Tsepho Matlala International Distribution Plan B - Creative Agency for Performing Arts.

By and With Alexandra Bodí, Brandon Mangangelele, Bongani Mangena, Emil Bordás, Jackson Mogotlane, Jhon Mbuso Sithole, Jubleen Msusa, Miki Shoji, Mncedesi Mlungisi Lloyd Pududu, Mongezi Siphiwo Mahlobo, Michelle Owami Ndlovu, Nontobeko Portia Ngubane, Privilege Siyabonga Ndhlovu, Sandiso (Zulu) Mbatha, Shantel Ayanda Mnguni, Thulani Lord Mgidi, Tshepang Lebelo, Temosho Evginea Dolo, Thando Ndlovu, Ukho Somadlaka, Vusi Magoro.

A co-production of Constanza Macras I DorkyPark, The Windybrow Arts Centre and Market Theatre, Ruhrtriennale and Kampnagel. Supported by the International Co-Production Fund of the Goethe-Institut and by the NATIONAL PERFORMANCE NETWORK Coproduction Funding Dance, funded by the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media.