A light brown wooden construction stands in a white, sterile room. Two large screens are built into the construction, on one of which people can be seen dancing together from behind.
© Independence Cha Cha
A light brown wooden construction stands in a white, sterile room. Two large screens are built into the construction, on one of which people can be seen dancing together from behind.
© Independence Cha Cha

Untranquil Now: A Constellation of Narratives and Resonances

With Trisha Brown, Lucinda Childs, Ângela Ferreira, Anca Munteanu Rimnic, Anri Sala and more

Artistic Gestures, Configurations, Performances and Projections

In collaboration with Hamburger Kunsthalle, Summer Festival presents video works, performances, installations, and a cinema screening at various locations in Hamburg. The works are realized as part of the exhibition UNTRANQUIL NOW at the Kunsthalle, which explores forms of displacement of the stage and the relationship of artworks to memory, heritage, and intimacy. In the Kunsthalle itself, additional video works by Summer Festival artists Lucinda Childs, Trisha Brown, and Anri Sala, are on dispaly as well. These include Childs’ postmodernist manifesto CARNATION (1964), and her works CALICO MINGLING (1973) and KATEMA (1978), which were created from unaffected, simple movements and gestures.


Anca Munteanu Rimnic: RITE FOR FALL

RITE FOR FALL is a site-specific performance that will be showcased throughout this year’s Summer Festival in a converted shop window located in the Jupiter building next to the main railway station. In a choreographic staging, Berlin-based artist Anca Munteanu Rimnic causes a quivering haystack to interact with performers, creating a series of dramatic miniatures that serve as a grotesque condensation of human life. With fragmentary images and sounds, the work intervenes in the bustling inner city, turning passersby into spectators and the city into a stage. In the former Karstadt Sports building, Jupiter, and opposite the vacant Kaufhof building – both symbols of one of the largest real estate bankruptcies in Europe – an artistic intervention is being created in a vibrant city center in crisis mode.

Ângela Ferreira: Indépendance Cha Cha, 2014/2024

The large-scale wooden sculpture by the Portuguese-South African artist borrows its modernist form from the facade of a petrol station in Lubumbashi, designed by the Belgian architect Claude Strebelle in the 1950s. Incorporated are videos of two singers expressing their fear of descending into the mines, as well as the band from Hôtel du Parc in Lubumbashi performing “Indépendance Cha Cha,” a significant anthem of the African Francophone independence movements in the 1960s.